History

U.S. History I

Course Type: Core                   Course Length: Full year                      Credits: 5.00

Throughout this course we will examine major events, people, and themes that shaped the formation and rise of our nation. Our length of study will encompass America’s colonial founding up to the birth of Modern America (roughly 1600’s – 1900’s). Topics of study will include periods such as the American Revolution, The Constitution and the Young Republic, The Jacksonian Era, Manifest Destiny, The Civil War and Reconstruction, and the Rise of Industry. Students will be actively involved with study skills, hands on activities, essays, and various other assignments. As a class we will learn how to think and write like a historian. Students will go beyond the acquisition of facts to develop skills for collection, in-depth analysis, and interpretation of information important to the study of United States History. Through careful examination of various sources, both primary and secondary, we will be able to form a better comprehension of our past and be able to comprehend how it shapes our society today.

 

U.S. History II

Course Type: Core                   Course Length: Full year                      Credits: 5.00

US2 begins where US1 left off, our country is recovering from the Civil War and becoming a superpower. US2 covers the time period of Reconstruction to present day. The course aims to engage students in an examination of how the United States has developed politically, economically, socially, and culturally over the past century into a world superpower. The focus will be on the evolution and impact of US foreign and domestic policy. We will also examine current events and contemporary issues on a weekly basis. In each unit, students will be asked to reflect on a specific thematic essential questions, the focus of our study of that period of history. These questions will engage students in developing critical thinking skills through writing assignments. .

 

World History

Course Type: Core                   Course Length: Full year                      Credits: 5.00

Throughout this course students will learn exactly what history is, how we study it, and why it is important. While it is impossible to cover every topic in the history of the world, we will do our best to engage in a comprehensive and exploratory study of history from the ancient civilizations through the modern era. Along the way we will uncover information about the earliest traces of man, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, The Renaissance, Imperialism, Rise of Industry, Revolution and many other periods, regions, and themes in history. Students will be actively involved with study skills, hands on activities, essays, and various other assignments. As a class we will learn how to think and write like a historian. Through careful examination of various sources, both primary and secondary, we will be able to form a better comprehension of civilizations of the past and make connections as to how these ancient worlds helped to shape our modern world.

 

AP U.S. History

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: Full year                      Credits: 5.00

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials-their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance-and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Students may receive college credit based upon their score on the AP US History Exam taken in May.

 

Prerequisites: Recommendation from 10th or 11th grade history teacher. Students will also be expected to sign an agreement available from the instructor

 

Government

Course Type: AUL Requirement         Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

Throughout this course students will learn about the basic functions and structure of our government. A strong emphasis will be placed on applying principles learned in class to current issues. The primary objective of this class is to help students develop critical thinking skills as they become more actively aware of the government policies and practices that affect every aspect of life in the United States. Students will go beyond the acquisition of facts to develop skills for collection, in-depth analysis, and interpretation of information important to the study of government.  Students in this Government course will engage in analysis of primary sources, including those specific to the founding of the United States, speeches, landmark Supreme Court cases, and relevant political commentaries. Furthermore, students will develop a deep understanding of issues pertinent to the upcoming Presidential election and why civic participation is not only a right, but a duty.

 

Geography

Course Type: AUL Requirement         Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

World Geography is the study of the world’s peoples, places, and environments, with a focus on world regions. Students will learn about climates and terrain of various regions as well as political and economic differences including government, GDP, and population. Particular emphasis is placed on students’ understanding and applying geographic concepts and skills to their daily lives.

 

Criminology

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

 

Economics

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

Students will study macro and microeconomics and the law of supply and demand.

 

Multicultural Studies

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

 

Philosophy

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

 

An introduction to philosophical thinking in general. The course focuses on several characteristic examples and the philosophy of numerous philosophers throughout history, thereby illustrating how classical and modern thinkers formulate their questions and how they approach issues ranging from religion, scientific, political, metaphysics and ethics. Consequently, we shall focus on questions (for instance: Is knowledge possible? Does it come from reason or from experience? Are human actions free or determined? Why is there evil? Are moral norms relative or absolute? What is man’s responsibility to society? What is science’s responsibility to society?). In addition, the course will provide a preliminary orientation about the notion of philosophical argument, its various forms and the ways arguments should be analyzed and developed. At various times students will be examining graphic novelizations of different philosophers. Students will also examine how philosophers develop philosophical ideas through the influence of previous and/or contemporary philosophers. In order to accomplish this, students will have to make connections between philosophers and time periods.

 

Political Science

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One semester               Credits: 2.50

This course presents an overview of the discipline, including the basic theories, concepts, approaches, and enduring questions of political science. It provides students with a foundation of knowledge and the analytical skills necessary to understand modern politics in historical context.

 

Sociology

Course Type: Elective              Course Length: One Semester               Credits: 2.50

This course is designed to introduce students to the theories, concepts and areas of inquiry that typically characterize sociological analyses. Specific areas to be covered may include: culture, socialization and social interaction, social groups, deviance, social class, race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and aging.  Sociology furnishes an academic foundation for responsible citizenship in a multi-racial and multi-cultural global community.  Students will also be expected to analyze and interpret a variety of primary and secondary source materials.